February, 2016

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$27.7 M. Awarded to Pilot Injured in Plane Crash

arbitration
In Kedrowski v. Valters Aviation, Lycoming et al. $27.7 m. in compensation was awarded to Mahtomedi Minnesota’s Mark Kedrowski, after faulty airplane parts in the plane he was piloting caused a crash that changed his life. Any time an accident results in amputation, the medical bills, prosthetics, and compensating technologies result in escalating medical bills. The award will will enable Kedrowski to deal with lifetime costs resulting from the accident.

On September 3, 2010, Mark had been flying a Kwech GLASAIR RG SUPER 11S airplane. It crashed near lake Elmo Minnesota. After the accident, Kedrowski was found trapped in the plane, still in his seat belt. Kedrowski held a FAA private pilot certificate with airplane single engine land and instrument ratings and a third-class medical certificate.

Kedrowski’s case was handled in Ramsey County. Lycoming Engine denied that their malfunctioning fuel pump was responsible.

Husband of Akron Plane Crash Victim Files Lawsuit Against Plane’s Owner

courtroomThe husband of Diana Suriel, one of the seven passengers killed in a plane crash last year, has filed a lawsuit against the plane’s owner in a Florida court.

The Hawker 125-700 plane went down on November 10th while it was attempting to land at Akron Fulton International Airport in Summit County, Ohio. There were nine people aboard at the time, including the pilot, the co-pilot, and seven passengers; all of them were killed in the crash.

The lawsuit filed by Diana’s husband Joel Castillo said that Rais Group International, that owned the plane, as well as ExecuFlight Inc., that leased it from the owner, allowed the pilots to fly the plane with defective equipment. It further alleges that the pilots did not have proper licenses and operated the aircraft at a dangerously low altitude that made the landing difficult.

Johnson & Johnson Ordered to Pay $72 Million for Ovarian Cancer Death Linked to Talcum Powder

Justice scale on blue backgroundA jury in the Missouri Circuit Court in St. Louis has ordered Johnson & Johnson (J&J) to pay $72 million in a wrongful death suit.

The lawsuit was filed by the family of Jackie Fox who died of ovarian cancer. The family claims that the cancer was caused by the J&J talcum powder that Fox used throughout her life. According to the lawsuit, the company failed to warn the customers that the talc used in their feminine hygiene products can migrate through the vagina and increase the risk of ovarian cancer.

The jury found that the company was aware of the increased risk of ovarian cancer from talc but did not take any action to warn the customers.

The company has been ordered to pay $10 million in compensatory damages and $62 million in punitive damages.